ATF Chinese Pitch 2018

Chinese Version

ATF Chinese Pitch 2019


The premier Chinese pitching event for those with innovative ideas is set to encourage, promote and reward creativity, originality and innovation. It includes 2 distinct pitches in the movie and online drama series space, across all genres.

Time to get that script out of the bottom draw, finish it and enter!

All are welcome*!

PITCH YOUR IDEA FOR THE CHINESE-SPEAKING AUDIENCE
ENTER NOW

Win S$3,500

With the potential to get your script bought for S$15,000!

* English entries will be translated into Chinese, as all finished production is targeted at Chinese-speaking territories globally. Please read the Rules & Regulations / FAQ on further information regarding language matters.

KEY DATES

  • 15 May 2019: Call for submissions open
  • 15 August 2019: Deadline for treatment submissions
  • 15 October 2019: Deadline for scripts submissions
  • 20 November 2019: Finalists announced
  • 4 December 2019: Live Pitch

SUBMIT YOUR ENTRIES

2019 Judges

Definitions

  • Logline (Max 30 Words)
    A brief (usually one-sentence) summary of a programme / film that states the central conflict of the story, often providing both a synopsis of the story's plot.
  • Synopsis (Max 500 Words)
    A brief summary of the major points of a subject or written work or story.
  • Treatment (Max 5000 Words)
    A piece of prose, typically the step between scene cards (index cards) and the first draft of a screenplay for a motion picture, programme or radio play. It is generally longer and more detailed than an outline (or one-page synopsis), and it may include details of directorial style that an outline omits.
  • Character breakdown
    A detailed analysis of the character development in the work or play, ranging from the character functions, emotions to their backgrounds.
  • Detailed budget
    A realistic approach to shooting budget from pre-production to post-production.
  • Target audience
    The intended audience or viewers for a certain work / programme.

Global Partner: 
G.H.Y Culture & Media



The Quill

An Asian Beginning…
A nib attached to a sort of stylus that could be dipped into ink can be traced back to around 1800BC when the Chinese developed plant, animal and mineral inks. South Indian scholars were writing with sharp needles and ink made of a variety of substances from tar to burned and moistened ground bones from at least 400BC. Much later in history, sticks of ink were imported from Asia and the Orient to liquefy with water. This gave birth to the term ‘Indian ink’.

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